Gallery

/Gallery
  • Classroom Under the Trees

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    Education was a priority, and it kept our minds occupied. We learned English, math, and Kiswahili under those trees. Our teachers tried to help us rise above our situation so that someday we may return to Sudan as educated leaders.
  • Lion Chase

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    During the journey, we encountered lions along the way that attacked us. When we saw a lion, we would come together in tight groups. We would yell, scream, and throw sticks to scare the lion away. If we did not have time to organize into groups, our only option was to run for the trees.
  • Zebras

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    I saw many wild animals along the way during my journey, including predators and many other animals. Zebras most often came to my attention as my favorite animal because of their peaceful nature. Their attractive appearance, with their beautiful stripes, added to the landscape
  • Shooting in Magoos

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    Thousands of us had just crossed the Kosingara desert, and we were finally close to Kenya. We had come so far and didn’t have the energy to look for a safe place to sleep, so we just lay down randomly in a dried-up riverbed to sleep. Sometime in the night government militia ambushed us while we slept out there in the open. They fired guns on us. Many were fallen.
  • Tiang Antelope

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    The impact of the longest civil war between North and South Sudan, not only ended 2.5 million lives, but also greatly affected wildlife as well. Most of the animals had faced threats due to the mass killing and hearing the endless gunfire. Many escaped to neighboring countries for safety. The Tiang antelope is one- of-a-kind animal that inhabited the Piol area for a long time, but was rarely seen during the war. I was more that delighted during my last visit to Piol when I witnessed the migration of this antelope back to the area. Their presence signifies the peace and stability in the territory
  • Struggling with lion

    $30.00$60.00
    During the journey, we encountered lions along the way that attacked us. When we saw a lion, we would come together in tight groups. We would yell, scream, and throw sticks to scare the lion away. If we did not have time to organize into groups, our only option was to run for the trees.
  • This work reveals my long journey from Africa to the United States.  When I was six-years-old, I was separated from my family and became an unaccompanied minor, spending 14 years in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya before I made my new home in Nashville, Tennessee, prior to relocating to Columbus, Ohio in 2006.  It reflects the hardship I endured in the past and the hope for a better tomorrow.  Even more important, it also symbolizes the devotion of friends and colleagues, who assist Lost Boys in their changing lives in the diaspora and back home.
  • Surviving on Wild Plants

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    We did not have any food to eat because relief agencies were forbidden access to this area by the government of Sudan. We ate wild leaves, fruit, and roots – things we had not tried to eat before, just to sustain ourselves.
  • Bible study

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    During the journey, we did not have a building or any holy place to worship our Lord but under the tree service was the only best option. We study bible, prayed and praised the Lord there. Jesus was the only way we had day and night.
  • The Last Memory

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    My last memory is of my beautiful Dinka yard. I was in the yard with my cattle when war broke out in my village. When I heard the sounds of bombs and gunfire, I fled and never saw my family or my home again.
  • Christmas Marching

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    On holidays, especially Christmas and Easter, we would celebrate our salvation with marches, songs, and dances. Weeks before the event, we would prepare our special uniforms – black pants, white shirts, and red sashes with white crosses. We also made our wooden crosses that we carried. Some who had learned tailoring or carpentry in the camp stayed very busy helping out at this time. The boy in the front, in all white, is the leader of the march and the teacher of the songs and dances.
  • In 1987 civil war broke out in southern Sudan.  I was  six years old and was forced to walk 1,500 miles with 35,000 other Lost Boys of Sudan in search of a safe place. We faced many hardships including lion attacks, starvation, dehydration, disease, dangerous river crossings and attacks by enemy soldiers.  I spent 14 years living in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya before finally being resettled in Nashville.  I relocated to Columbus, Ohio in 2006 where I graduated from The Ohio State University in 2009 with a degree in fine arts. I was awarded the Robert M. Duncan Alumni Citizenship Award in 2016 for my work in building a medical clinic in my village in South Sudan. Read how I overcame countless obstacles to survive and turn my tragedy into an incredible story of hope and inspiration to others. “I dedicated this book to my family in South Sudan. I never lost hope that someday we would be reunited. Also to all the 16,000 Lost Boys who survived and journeyed with me during those difficult years including my cousin Jok”.